Welcome Back! Our first discussion, 26 September: ‘Creativity within Scottish primary education’

Welcome back to the 2017/2018 academic year! We are gearing up for a year of new discussions and presentations from our PhD members from Schools across the University, and look forward to covering a wide variety of topics in childhood and youth study areas. Our first discussion of the year is on Tuesday, 26 September at 4 pm with Krystallia Kyritsi, who is submitting her thesis in Moray House School of Education this semester. She’ll be leading a discussion on her research about creativity in public schools in Scotland, drawing on her ethnographic research with 12 year olds in primary school. For those working in a school context, this is especially for you! We look forward to hearing about this unique topic and can’t wait to see you there — all interested are welcome and we hope to see some new faces!

Title: ‘Creativity within Scottish primary education: exploring children’s perspectives on creativity and barriers to its practical implementation’

Date/Time: Tuesday, 26 September, 4 pm

Location: Paterson’s Land 1.18 (map)

Abstract: Creativity has been explored through a plethora of definitions over the years. Most researchers perceive creativity as an individual trait and dominant definitions of creativity are based on psychological frameworks that mainly focus on individual creativity. However, there has recently been an increasing interest in exploring children’s collaborative creativity (Chappell, 2007; Craft et al, 2014; Davis, 2011). Despite that, there are still many unanswered questions regarding children’s perspectives on creativity and regarding how creativity can be fostered in schools through children’s individual or collaborative work. In this talk I will present children’s diverse perspectives on creativity and I will draw particular attention to how children’s differences (gender, race, age, disability) influence the way children perform and embody creativity. This presentation will also explore cultural and structural barriers to the practical implementation of creativity in schools. The talk will draw on findings of an ethnographic research (which involved participant observation and semi-structured interviews with 25 children and 2 teachers) that was conducted in one Scottish primary school classroom. This presentation will discuss findings of this study that strongly indicate that children perceive creativity not only as an individual characteristic, but also as a process that is performed through collaboration and will explore cultural and structural barriers to fostering childhood creativity in schools.

A note to Network members and friends: we are working on filling up our calendar of events for the semester that cover childhood and youth studies topics. Have an event that we should know about and publicise? Email sarah.weakley@ed.ac.uk to let me know!

 

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Register now for the Interweaving Conference, 6 September, Moray House School of Education

Next Wednesday, 6 September the University of Edinburgh’s Moray House School of Education are putting on the Interweaving Conference, their biannual staff and doctoral research conference. Conference registration will be open until the end of the day TOMORROW, 29 August — so register your place today!

This free conference will investigate and share the national and international research being undertaken by doctoral students and academic staff from the School of Education in the University of Edinburgh. The range and diversity of research interests and approaches within, across and between perspectives and traditions are a great strength and the conference will bring together established researchers and new researchers.

The key aims of this conference are to:
– celebrate the research that our students and staff are involved in
– showcase our research across a range of streams of educational inquiry
– consider how our different research interests and perspectives intersect within the context of a common educational agenda
facilitate (further) opportunities for networking between students, early career researchers and academic staff of Moray House School of Education (and beyond).

To learn more about the conference, including registering your place, please head to the conference website: http://www.intranet.education.ed.ac.uk/Research/Conferences/Interweaving2017/index.php

Summer hiatus: see you in September!

Thank you to everyone who has attended any of the Network events this year, and for all of you who are following our work in jiscmail and elsewhere. We had a great year of seminars from University of Edinburgh PhD candidates, covering topics such as youth transitions and social justice, autism, childhood friendship, emotions and childhood practice and much more. We also topped off the year with the Young People’s Transitions Conference in April, which was a great day.

As things slow down here on campus we’ll also be taking a break from our monthly seminars and will pick up those again in September. Although the presenters at these seminars will be PhD students and early career researchers, these free seminars are open to anyone both inside and outside the University — so if you are interested in youth or childhood studies topics please subscribe to our jiscmail to hear about these events and come along! We also use jiscmail as the primary medium to send out other events of interest to this network, both here in Scotland and elsewhere, and you can use it as a place to publicise your event as well. Over the summer we will still be publicising events of note on jiscmail and keeping the Upcoming Events calendar updated if at all possible.

We will also be posting in the near future a document from both the Listening Session and the feedback survey from the Young People’s Transitions Conference that took place in April. Both have provided us with some great feedback about what you’d like to see covered in future seminars or events.

And importantly: if you are a PhD student who would like to present for the network or if you have an event that you would like publicised to the Network please email me (sarah.weakley@ed.ac.uk). I’d love to hear from you!

See you all in September and have a great summer!

Young People’s Transitions Conference: thank you and materials from keynotes & presenters now available

Thank you to all of those who attended the Young People’s Transitions Conference two weeks ago at the University of Edinburgh. We had a great day hearing from PhD and early-career researchers on their ongoing work, with a fantastic team of academic discussants to lead audience members in thoughtful discussions. We also want to extend our thanks to the three keynote speakers, who spoke on three different and important topics in the field of youth transitions. The variety of topics and discussions made this a unique and enjoyable day.

If you have not taken a look at the compendium of briefing papers we released on the day of the conference please take a look at those now. We’ve also now made available the slides from our three keynote speakers and the PDFs of the four posters that were displayed during the day.

Take a look at all these materials now!  

Keep an eye out for an upcoming document covering what we heard from the day’s participants in the Listening Session — coming soon!

TODAY! The Young People’s Transitions Conference — briefing papers now available

Today we welcome over 100 delegates from academia, government and the third sector to the University of Edinburgh for our Conference ‘Young People’s Transitions: Dimensions, Difficulties and Diversity’. We are so pleased to get this day underway with all of our delegates and our partners at the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships!

To see what we’re up to today, check out the conference programme or follow some of our friends who will be tweeting today with #yptconf2017.

For those who are unable to attend the conference, our 8 PhD/ECR presenters were gracious enough to write briefing papers that we have compiled into a compendium for you to view. These papers are short works that cover key aspects of their research they will share with delegates today.

Access the briefing papers here

We also plan to create a document synthesising the discussion of today’s Listening Session, which will be up on the Network website in the coming months. Thank you all for your support of this project, and we look forward to staying in touch about this work and others in the coming months.

Young People’s Transitions Conference — full conference programme now available!

In just two weeks the University of Edinburgh will welcome 150 delegates from a variety of disciplines and sectors for Young People’s Transitions: Dimensions, Difficulties and Diversity on April 21st. In preparation for the Conference, and for those unable to attend but who would like to know more about the day’s events, the full conference programme is now available. This includes bios and abstracts for our three keynote speakers, and abstracts for all eight of the PhD/Early-Career Researcher presentations that will take place throughout the day.

Please take a look at the Conference Programme here.

A few days before the Conference we will also be publishing on the website a compendium of eight briefing papers from the PhD/ECR presenters on the work they will share at the Conference. This will allow for those unable to attend the Conference (or delegates not able to attend all presentations) an opportunity to access all the great research from our presenters. Stay tuned!

Next event, Wednesday 5 April, 4pm: ‘Love, Passion and Professionalism: The Early Years Lead Professional’

The Network’s next presentation will be given by Jane Malcolm, a PhD Candidate in Education, on ‘Love, Passion and Professionalism: The Early Years Lead Professional.’

When: Wednesday, 5 April 2017, 4:00 – 5:00 pm

Where: Charteris Land, Room 4.02, Moray House School of Education, Holyrood Road, EH8 8AQ University of Edinburgh

Abstract:

Murray (2013) talks of an internal view of professional self-being crucial because it is based on individual values and informs practice. She argues that this internal view is what allows the Early Years Lead Professional to practice their profession with integrity.  This raised a question concerning whether having the freedom to care with passion and love is critical to inspiring professionalism (Moyles, 2010) and whether personal values and principles are an integral part of their development of professional identities. Research tells us of the importance to development of love; Zeedyk (2016) argues that “young human brains are wired: for relationships, for love” and Bowlby (1953:240) describes love in infancy and childhood as being “as important for mental health as are vitamins and proteins for physical health.” My research boldly argues that love should be recognised as a professional standard. In response to a recent review the Scottish Government has redesigned the inspection methodology to take account of measuring “softer” outcomes, such as love and care, (Scot Gov, 2015:10). At present it would appear, through the data collected for this project to-date, that interpretation of these “softer outcomes” amongst Professionals varies. Although all Professionals interviewed agreed that relationships and love were important.

My research therefore seeks to pose questions and stimulate discussion, through interviews and reflective practice diaries, around how professionals engage with the “softer outcomes”, e.g. of love and passion, in their work. And what “softer outcomes” mean for professional standards and the delivery of services to children and families.

Key words: love, professionalism, early-years, values, relationships.

References

Bowlby, J (1953) Childcare and the Growth of Love. Open University: Middlesex.

Moyles, (2010) Passion, Paradox and Professionalism in Early Years Eduction. Early Years: An International Research Journal. 21 (2) 81-95

Murray (2013) Becoming an early years professional: developing a new professional identity. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal. 21 (4) 527 – 540.

Scot Gov, (2015) Scottish Government Response to an Independent Review of the Scottish Early Learning and Childcare (ELC) and Out of School Care (OSC) workforce. The Scottish Government: Edinburgh.

Zeedyk, S (2016) How childcare Policies are undermining our children’s capacity to love. Blog Entry, http://www.suzannezeedyk.com