Young People’s Transitions Conference: Registration now open!

**Registration is now currently at capacity for this conference. However, we encourage you to get on the waitlist if you are interested in this conference. There will likely be registrants who are no longer able to attend and tickets will be released as they are made available. 

Registration is now open for Young People’s Transitions: Dimensions, Difficulties and Diversity, a free, one-day conference for youth researchers, policymakers and practitioners on Friday 21 April 2017 at the University of Edinburgh.

The Conference seeks to explore, illuminate and interrogate the complexity of young people’s lives today and ask questions relating to the myriad factors that shape the youth phase. Studies of young people making life transitions across the youth period (age 10 to 24) give us a deeper and more nuanced understanding of how different aspects of young people’s lives interpenetrate – in employment, health, family, peer relationships, media, housing, culture, poverty, disadvantage and more. This area of research is nothing if not multidimensional and multidisciplinary, so we seek presenters and participants that encompass diverse viewpoints from the academic, policy and practice communities that engage with young people.

Head to the Registration page now via Eventbrite or learn more about the Conference in the webpages here. Registration will be limited to 100 delegates, but the Conference will be running a waitlist. Please register as soon as you can!

Until Monday 13 February we will be seeking Conference abstracts from PhD or early-career researchers from a variety of disciplines to present at the Conference. Send in your abstract now or forward to your colleagues —  see  Call for Abstracts.

Please share this event with your colleagues at your University, in government or in the practitioner/third sector who may be interested in this Conference. We can’t wait for you to join us at the Conference in April!

Any questions or concerns please email Sarah Weakley at sarah.weakley@ed.ac.uk.

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‘Friendship with peers as a source of help for children of migrant parents: the case of a rural boarding school in China’ January 24 Network Seminar by Yan Zhu, PhD Social Policy (Childhood Studies)

Welcome back! We hope you had a great holiday break and have come back to work with renewed enthusiasm! The Network is back this semester, beginning with our January seminar by Yan Zhu, a PhD Candidate in Social Policy (Childhood Studies) on 24 January at 4 pm. There she will present her fieldwork from her time researching in a rural boarding school in China, investigating the possibility and necessity of involving children as a source of help to contribute to children of migrant parents’ wellbeing, particularly in their friendships. For those in childhood studies and particularly for anyone with an interest in child participation issues, this is for you!

Friendship with peers as a source of help for children of migrant parents: the case of a rural boarding school in China
Yan Zhu, PhD Candidate Social Policy (Childhood Studies)
24 January 4:00 pm, Room 1.12 Chrystal Macmillan Building

Abstract:
Children of migrant parents in rural areas of China are normally defined as a group of children who are under 16 years old and remain in rural areas while both of their parents move to urban areas as migrant workers, or one parent moves to the city as a migrant worker and the remaining parent has no ability to provide care to the child. As a group of vulnerable children, children of migrant parents have attracted a lot of attention in China in recent years. Many policies and practices were launched with an aim of supporting children of migrant parents to improve their wellbeing. However, it seems that the majority of these policies and practices are adult-led approaches with very limited space for child participation. Thus, the presentation will focus on discussing the possibility and necessity of involving children as a source of help to contribute to children of migrant parents’ wellbeing; particularly on exploring what kinds of help children could gain from their friendships with peers in the context of boarding school.